First Beatle Cars

These were the first cars bought by the young Beatles although Ringo was still a Hurricane when he bought his.  Rory Storm and the Hurricanes were much more successful in 1959 and 1960 than the Beatles (or whatever they were calling themselves at that time).   Hence, Ringo had a “flash” car before John, Paul, or George did.

I haven’t necessarily found images of the exact year (although they’re close) or color.  I got my information from Mark Lewisohn’s All These Years: Tune In (Extended Special Edition).  Any mistakes are mine, not his.

Ringo

Standard Vanguard

ringo_1_Standard_Vanguard_Vignale_1959_2080cc
Standard Vanguard

Purchased in 1959.  See page 559 of Lewisohn.

Ford Zephyr Zodiac

ringo_2_280px-Ford_Zephyr_111_Zodiac_1956
Ford Zephyr Zodiac

Purchased in 1960.  See page 708 of Lewisohn.

Neil Aspinall/Mona Best

Ford van

I have no idea whether this is the right model, but it is the right make, Ford.

neil_1_Ford_Thames_Van_1961_F_Rick_Feibusch_2009
British Ford van

Purchased in 1961.  This wasn’t the Beatles’ first mode of transport.  See page 942 of Lewisohn.

George

Ford Anglia 105E Deluxe

george_1_anglia
Anglia

Purchased in 1962.  See page 1145 of Lewisohn.  See page 1145 of Lewisohn for information on the race of “Ford Anglia against Ford Zodiac, Beatle vs Hurricane.”

Paul

Ford Consul Classic

paul_1_FordConsulClassic
Ford Consul Classic

Purchased in 1962.  See page 1307 of Lewisohn.

John

Driving test

John passed his driving test and had cars, but was probably one of the worst drivers in the world.

john_driving_test
John passes the driving test.
First Beatle Cars

“Young Hunting”: Child Ballad 68

YoungHunting

Young Hunting

“Get down, get down, Love Henry,” she cried.
“And stay all night with me.
I have gold chains, and the finest I have
I’ll apply them all to thee.”

“I can’t get down and I shan’t get down,
Or stay all night with thee.
Some pretty little girl in Cornersville
I love far better than thee.”

He layed his head on a pillow of down.
Kisses she gave him three.
With a penny knife that she held in her hand
She murdered mortal he.

“Get well, get well, Love Henry, ” She cried,
“Get well, get well,” said she.
“Oh don’t you see my own heart’s blood
Come flowin’ down so free?”

She took him by his long yellow hair,
And also by his feet.
She plunged him into well water, where
It runs both cold and deep.

“Lie there, lie there, Love Henry,” she cried,
“Til the flesh rots off your bones.
Some pretty little girl in Cornersville
Will mourn for your return.”

“Hush up, hush up, my parrot,” she cried,
“And light on my right knee.
The doors to your cage shall be decked with gold
And hung on a willow tree.”

“I won’t fly down, I can’t fly down
And light on your right knee.
A girl who would murder her own true love
Would kill a little bird like me.”

See Mad Love, Murder & Mayhem, by Joshua Hampton, for more about this ballad.

“Young Hunting”: Child Ballad 68

“The Bailiff’s Daughter of Islington”: Child Ballad 105

BailiffsDaughterIslington.jpg

From A Book of Old Ballads, designed by Alice Havers

The Bailiff’s Daughter of Islington

There was a fair and fine young man and he was a squire’s son
He loved a Bailiff’s daughter dear She lived at Islington
But she was coy and never would on him her heart bestow
So they sent him down to London town because he loved her so
And she sang
Lu lie, Lu lie lo, and a Lu lie lay
Lu lie, Lu lie lo as he rode away

When seven long years had passed away she put on mean attire
And went straight down to London town about him to inquire
Well as she passed along the road through peril toil and pain
She rested on a distant place and her true love he came riding
And he sang
Lu lie, Lu lie lo, and a Lu lie lay
Lu lie, Lu lie lo as he rode away

Well kind young sir, tell unto me where did you learn that tune?
From a girl that I loved dear when I was a youth.
But, That was oh so long ago to think I loved in vain.
She died so many years ago. I never saw her again.
Then she sang
Lu lie, Lu lie lo, and a Lu lie lay
Lu lie, Lu lie lo as he rode away

Well she is not dead but alive dear man and standing by your side
She is not dead but alive dear man and ready to be thy bride
And they sang
Lu lie, Lu lie lo, and a Lu lie lay
Lu lie lu lie lo as they rode away.

Performed by Raymond Crooke.

“The Bailiff’s Daughter of Islington”: Child Ballad 105

“The Elfin Knight”: Child Ballad 2

ChildBallads

The Elfin Knight

There stands three trumpeters on yon hill
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
Blaw their trumpets sae loud and shrill
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Gin I’d his trumpet in my kist
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
And were in the lad’s arms that I like best
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Gin ye would be wed wi’ me
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
There’s ae thing ye maun dae for me
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

I maun hae a fine linen sark
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
Without a stitch o’ needlewark
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Ye maun wash it in yon draw-well
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
Where water never sprang nor fell
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Ye maun drt’t on yon hawthorn
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
That hasna seen blossom since man was born
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Gin I mak’a sark for thee
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
There’s ae thing ye maun tae me dae
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

My faither has an acre o’ land
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
Ye maun ploo it wi’ your ae hand
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Ye maun sow it wantin’ corn
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
And roll it wi’ a sheep’s shank-bone
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Ye maun shear it wi’ a scythe o’ leather
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
And bind it wi’ a peacock’s feather
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

Ye maun stook it in the sea
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
And bring the whaetsheaf dry tae me
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

And gin you wark noo all this wark
Blaw, blaw, blaw winds, blaw
Come to me and you’ll get your sark
And the wind blaws aye my plaid awa’

“The Elfin Knight”: Child Ballad 2

“Lord Randall”: Child Ballad 12

1280px-Lord_Randal

“Lord Randal”, by Arthur Rackham. This is an illustration from Some British ballads, published in about 1919.

“Lord Randall”

O, where have you been, Lord Randall, my son
O, where have you been, my handsome young man
I’ve been to the wildwoods, Mother make my bed soon
For I’m weary with hunting an’ I fain would lie down

Where gat ye your dinner, Lord Randall, my son
Where gat ye your dinner, my handsome young man
I did eat with my true love, Mother make my bed soon
For I’m weary with hunting an’ I fain would lie down

What get ye to your dinner, Lord Randall, my son
What get ye to your dinner, my handsome young man
A yellow pied snake, Mother fix my bed soon
For I’m weary with hunting an’ I fain would lie down

What became of your bloodhounds, Lord Randall, my son
What became of your bloodhounds, my handsome young man
O, they swelled an’ they died, Mother make my bed soon
For I’m weary with hunting an’ I fain would lie down

O, I fear you are poisoned, Lord Randall, my son
O, I fear you are poisoned, my handsome young man
O, yes I am poisoned, Mother make my bed soon
For I’m sick at my heart an’ I fain would lie down

“Lord Randall”: Child Ballad 12

“Riddles Wisely Expounded”: Child Ballad 1

RiddlesWiselyExpounded

Riddles Wisely Expounded

There were three sisters in the north
Lay the bend to the bonny broom,
And they lived in their mother’s house
And you’ll beguile a lady soon

There came a man one evening late
Lay the bend to the bonny broom,
And he came knocking at the gate
And you’ll beguile a lady soon.

The eldest sister let him in
And locked the door with a silver pin

The second sister made his bed
And laid soft pillows ‘neath his head

The youngest sister, fair and bright
She lay beside him all through the night

And in the morning, come the day
She said, “Young man, will you marry me?”

And he said, “Yes, I’ll marry thee
If you can answer this to me”

“What is greener than the grass?
And what is smoother than the glass?”

“What is louder than a horn?
And what is sharper than a thorn?”

“What is deeper than the sea?
And what is longer than the way?”

“Envy’s greener than the grass
Flattery’s smoother than the glass”

“Rumor’s louder than a horn
Slander’s sharper than a thorn”

“Regret is deeper than the sea
But love is longer than the way”

The eldest sister rang the bell
She rang it from the highest hill

The second sister made the gown
She sewed it of the silk so fine

The youngest sister, true and wise
They’ve made of her a lovely bride

And now fair maids, I bid adieu
These parting words I’ll leave with you

May you always constant prove
Lay the bend to the bonny broom,
Unto the one that you do love
And you’ll beguile a lady soon

“Riddles Wisely Expounded”: Child Ballad 1

“Raggle Taggle Gypsy”: Child Ballad 200

Raggle-Taggle-Gypsy

“The Raggle Taggle Gypsy”

There were three old gypsies came to our hall door
They came brave and boldly-o
And one sang high and the other sang low
And the other sang a raggle-taggle gypsy-o

It was upstairs downstairs the lady went
Put on her suit of leather-o
And there was a cry from around the door
She’s away wi’ the raggle-taggle gypsy-o

It was late that night when the Lord came in
Enquiring for his lady-o
And the servant girl she said to the Lord
“She’s away wi’ the raggle-taggle gypsy-o”

“Then saddle for me my milk-white steed
– my big horse is not speedy-o
And I will ride till I seek my bride
She’s away wi’ the raggle-taggle gypsy-o”

Now he rode East and he rode West
He rode North and South also
Until he came to a wide-open plain
It was there that he spied his lady-o

“How could you leave your goose feather bed
Your blankeys strewn so comely-o?
And how could you leave your newly wedded Lord
All for a raggle-taggle gypsy-o?”

“What care I for my goose feather bed
Wi’ blankets strewn so comely-o?
Tonight I lie in a wide-open field
In the arms of a raggle-taggle gypsy-o”

“How could you leave your house and your land?
How could you leave your money-o?
How could you leave your only wedded Lord
All for a raggle-taggle gypsy-o?”

“What care I for my house and my land?
What care I for my money-o?
I’d rather have a kiss from the yellow gypsy’s lips
I’m away wi’ the raggle-taggle gypsy-o!”

“Raggle Taggle Gypsy”: Child Ballad 200